Essay about History: Liberalism and Boer War

What the Boer War did for the British army was to make it revaluate its methods and armaments, to say nothing of its status in the eyes of the general public. The old class-conscious British army was not destroyed, as Lord Wolseley had hoped. On the other hand, ‘the War Office machine was given new premises, a new general staff, and a thorough overhaul. The Cabinet decided the partnership with the Commander-in-Chief was impossible and created a Chief of the Imperial General Staff instead, without warning the incumbent C-in-C, Roberts. He arrived one morning on 1904 to find that he had officially ceased to exist.’ With all of this “new broom”, the fact still remained that with the outbreak of war in 1914, the British Expeditionary Force still crossed over to the continent under a commander who had proven himself lacking in determination and tactical skills during the Boer War- this in itself is a damning indictment of the blinkered vision of the British army during this period.

The ghost of ‘The Breaker’ still rides. And the shadow of the Boer War still falls, however long.

There are also other causes for the outbreak of World War One including Political systems and developments, Colonial Conflicts and rivalries, The Moroccan Crises, The Balkan Wars and the July Crisis...


What were the causes of the Second Boer War? - Quora

Drummer Hodge is written about the Boer war (around 1899 - 1902), which was a war between the British and the Boers.

It was in South Africa that the distinctive qualities of Australian soldiers were first identified: tenacious fighters able to live off the land, sceptical of military rules and procedures, and in matters of discipline (as a British officer put it) ‘curiously lax’. Even so, the Boer War slipped from public consciousness relatively quickly. Although some two hundred monuments went up across the country, a number were shifted and some disappeared. The national monument in Melbourne – a plinth near the Shrine of Remembrance – is often overlooked even by historians. (A new one is currently being erected in Canberra.) The longer they lived, the more Boer War veterans felt sidelined. Some young people even thought it had been a foreign war.


The Weapons and Battles of the Second Anglo-Boer War

In terms of more conventional artillery, the British startedout fairly badly equipped; initially, only a small artillerycontingent could be fielded, and initial confrontations with Boerforces led to many pieces being overrun or "shot free"(all crewmen killed), and then captured. This was often the casewhen bad arrangement of forces in the case of a mobile enemy ledto units becoming isolated from one another. Common Britishartillery pieces were the 12 and 15 pound field guns, which had arange of around 5000 yards, and 5-inch howitzers which could hurla 50 pound shell over the same distance. The British also fieldednaval cannon in their desperation, stripped from the cruisers Terrible,Powerful, Monarch and Doris. These weapons hadlonger ranges than the other British guns (up to 10 000 yards forthe 4.7 inch guns). Home-made artillery pieces were also employedduring the sieges of Mafeking and Kimberley; these rose to alevel of renown far beyond the reach of their possibleeffectiveness. British cannon were often loaded with lydditeshells. This high-explosive compound was more effective thanstandard high explosive, and was used to terrible effect inseveral artillery engagements later in the war, when Britishartillery sections had been filled out and more guns had beenshipped to the South African theatre of operations.

(1880-1881) and the Second Boer War (1899-1902)

In terms of more conventional artillery, the British startedout fairly badly equipped; initially, only a small artillerycontingent could be fielded, and initial confrontations with Boerforces led to many pieces being overrun or "shot free"(all crewmen killed), and then captured. This was often the casewhen bad arrangement of forces in the case of a mobile enemy ledto units becoming isolated from one another. Common Britishartillery pieces were the 12 and 15 pound field guns, which had arange of around 5000 yards, and 5-inch howitzers which could hurla 50 pound shell over the same distance. The British also fieldednaval cannon in their desperation, stripped from the cruisers Terrible,Powerful, Monarch and Doris. These weapons hadlonger ranges than the other British guns (up to 10 000 yards forthe 4.7 inch guns). Home-made artillery pieces were also employedduring the sieges of Mafeking and Kimberley; these rose to alevel of renown far beyond the reach of their possibleeffectiveness. British cannon were often loaded with lydditeshells. This high-explosive compound was more effective thanstandard high explosive, and was used to terrible effect inseveral artillery engagements later in the war, when Britishartillery sections had been filled out and more guns had beenshipped to the South African theatre of operations.