Poverty and child abuse are top issues in the United States.

Social Work Research . 24(3): 131, Sept. 2000. This issue includes articles on kinship foster care, the effects of poverty on parenting and children’s behavior, group intervention with inmates, discharge from long-term psychiatric hospitals, and the application of a statistical procedure called multilevel covariance structure analysis.

It also evaluates the sociological theories and terminology that relate to the social issue.

Climate change refers to the change in statistical distribution of weather over periods of time that range from decades to even millions of years. It can be change in the average weather or change in the distribution of events for instance greater or less extreme weather (rain). Climate change can be a social problem in that it is known to be caused by human activities such as pollution which in turn affects the weather patterns of different regions. is a good example of climate change that is caused by human activities over the years. Changing climate patterns affect economic activities such as farming which in turn may cause poverty to communities dependent on farming as an economic activity

Framing Social Problems br / Theme Poverty br / 2.

The section that follows evaluates what is known and unknown about the particular social issue.

- Problems Facing Children in Foster Care research papers look at the issues associated with foster care such as brain development, and cognitive and social development.

Crime and Poverty is a Social Problem - Mega Essays

Welfare recipients: How do they become independent?
Cheng, T. (2002, September). Social Work Research, 26(3), 159-170.
This research used data concerning recipients’ employment, receipt of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), receipt of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and poverty status to develop a typology of adaptations by welfare recipients. Using U.S. Department of Labor survey data, a sample of AFDC/TANF recipients was analyzed through event history analysis. The results show that welfare reforms launched in 1996 moved dependent recipients out of welfare but had no effect on working recipients’ chances of leaving welfare. New two-year limits on unbroken program participation (and a five-year lifetime limit) pushed many unprepared recipients into poverty, working or not. Economic conditions became worse for working poor people than for those on welfare. The study also found that some former welfare recipients did go to work and eventually leave welfare and poverty. Occupational skills, work experience, child support, marriage, and experience in dependency or supplementation were among the factors promoting such a change.

Causes of Poverty — Global Issues

Beyond welfare or work: Teen mothers, household subsistence strategies, and child development outcomes.
Almgren, G., Yamashiro, G. & Ferguson, M. (2002, September). Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 29(3), 125-149.
There is probably no aspect of the work versus welfare debate that is more contested than the effects of welfare use on child development outcomes. Liberals tend to emphasize the detrimental effects of poverty and welfare stigma on children, while conservatives cite the negative socialization that occurs regarding the value of work within welfare-dependent families. However, large-scale longitudinal studies that have been used to address this question only indirectly measure critical influences on child development, such as maternal mental health, and do not consider the effect that a range of economic strategies that low-income mothers might undertake may have on their children. In this analysis, the authors employ data from a longitudinal study of 173 teen mothers to assess the relative effects of maternal characteristics and economic strategies on the developmental outcomes of their children at time of school entry. Two principal findings emerge. First, over the period from their first teen birth to the reference child’s entry into school, the sample subjects used a variety of household economic strategies aside from the simple welfare versus work dichotomy that is commonly used to depict the choices of teen mothers. Second, while maternal depression appears linked to the prevalence of problem behaviors in early childhood, the particular economic strategies used by the mothers in the sample do not explain any variation in either the prevalence of problem behaviors or in children’s learning preparation for school entry. These findings support the perspective that the influence of teen mothers’ parenting qualities on child development cannot be assessed through an analysis of their labor force participation, use of welfare, or other strategies of household subsistence.