An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting (Old …

It was under Richardson's employment that she wrote An Essayon the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting and then published it in1753 by Millar.It has been suggested that Richardson helped Collier write thework, but Richardson's lack of satirical skill has dispelled suchideas.Instead, it was probably James Harris and Fielding who helped craftthe satire, and all three probably helped to edit the work.However, most of Collier's help came from Fielding, who was a closefriend and shared many of her earlier works with Collier.

An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting is in the,and is available for free on , .

The conditions were not suitable, and she became the governess for 's daughter, Patty, by 1750. Richardson was impressed by her understanding of and along with her ability to perform her domestic duties. During this time, Collier was living with , and Richardson would spend time discussing writing with them.It was under Richardson's employment that she wrote . It has been suggested that Richardson helped Collier write the work, but Richardson's lack of satirical skill has dispelled such ideas. Instead, it was probably James Harris and Fielding who helped craft the satire, and all three probably helped to edit the work. However, most of Collier's help came from Fielding, who was a close friend and shared many of her earlier works with Collier.The first edition was printed by Richardson for in 1753. A second edition of the was published by Millar in 1757, two years after Collier's death, but with revisions made by her shortly after its first printing. Subsequently editions and revisions were published in 1795, 1804, 1805, 1806, 1808, 1809 and 1811.The is modelled on 's satire (1746), and even mentions Swift directly, but Collier reverses the roles in Swift's satire and instead writes from a perspective in the first book. All of her suggestions are to aid in the process of "teasing and mortifying".She begins her work with an actual "Essay on the Art of Tormenting" that serves as an introduction, before dividing the book into two parts.


An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting, ed

An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting by Jane Collier (review) ..

Collier's The Art of Ingeniously Tormenting has beendescribed as the "best-known generic satire written in theeighteenth century by a woman." Sheis one of the many female 18th-century authors (including ,Sarah Fielding, , and ) whoexperimented with "alternative models for relationships, fordifferent ways of regarding others and even for amelioratingsociety."