Essay on The Great Terror in Russia - 831 Words | …

Such is the natural dominion of habit that we regard the most arbitrary conventions, sometimes indeed the most defective institutions, as absolute measures of truth or falsehood, justice or injustice. It does not even occur to us that most are inevitably still connected with the prejudices on which despotism fed us. We have been so long stooped under its yoke that we have some difficulty in raising ourselves to the eternal principles of reason; anything that refers to the sacred source of all law seems to us to take on an illegal character, and the very order of nature seems to us a disorder. The majestic movements of a great people, the sublime fervors of virtue often appear to our timid eyes as something like an erupting volcano or the overthrow of political society; and it is certainly not the least of the troubles bothering us, this contradiction between the weakness of our morals, the depravity of our minds, and the purity of principle and energy of character demanded by the free government to which we have dared aspire.

He was responsible for one of the most notable and devastating genocides, the Great Purge.

Was born of illiterate peasant parents, his harsh spirit have been blamed on undeserved and severe beatings by his father, inspiring vengeful feelings toward anyone in a position to wield power over him (Stalin 1)....


SparkNotes: Joseph Stalin: The Great Terror and the …

Stalin was the supreme ruler of the Soviet Union for a quarter of a century....

Stalin then called for the execution of Ryutin (most communist did not believe in killing their own), Kirov, Stalin's supporter and the head of Leningrad headed the majority against the execution....