My mother was all I had growing up.

These contradictory impulses of cruelty and concern informed the actions of individual Victorians. Journalist W. T. Stead provides a perfect example. In 1885, he launched a campaign to raise awareness about child prostitution and prod the government to raise the age of consent. But his method of pursuing these admirable goals landed him in jail. To prove that virgins were being sold on the street in record numbers, he abducted a thirteen-year-old girl without telling her parents what he planned to do with her. After subjecting the unwitting girl to a medical exam to prove her purity, he drugged her, pretended to accost her, and sent her off to Paris. The lurid account he wrote of these events featured headings like “The Violation of Virgins” and “Strapping Girls Down.” It reads like pornography, yet it helped assure the passage of the Criminal Law Amendment Act of 1885, which raised the age of consent from thirteen to sixteen. This bizarre event encapsulates some of the conflicting discourses circulating around the Victorian child.

This understanding will remain with him as he grows up, marry, and embark on parenthood himself.

What we call the nature of the child is still apt to be regarded as entirely inborn or inherited, though more and more evidence tends to show that the most potent factors in forming basic character patterns are the first interpersonal relationships of the growing child. The purpose of my talk is to focus your attention on the powerful influence of family relationships in forming character and determining those human qualities known as “temperament” and “disposition.” Now medicine, and particularly, public health medicine, has made headway in determining and specifying and prescribing the factors essential for healthy growth. But it typifies the materialistic nature of our culture that no such progress has been made with those more intangible but equally real factors — the familial and parental attitudes which are also necessary for healthy growth.


Mum and Pup and Me - Growing Up the Only Child of …

Some children grow up with in single parent family, or with a mother and father.

I have made sacrifices in my life that are common for many women: putting my husband’s career before my own, and my child’s life and growth before my own as well, and for many years these sacrifices have been worthwhile...


Free Outline for Essays on Growing up - …

However, there are two important formation of families, one of then is a nuclear family, which defines as “a couple and their dependent children, regarded as a basic social unit.” Another one is an extended family, which is “a family which extends beyond the nuclear family to include grandparents and other relatives” (Oxford Dictionaries, 2014)....

Life Of A Blackbird: Child of War - Growing Up In Israel

Thus, although legislation aimed at regulating and reducing child labor was passed throughout the century, there was no attempt to outlaw it completely. Loopholes in laws like the 1833 Factory Act and the 1867 Workshops Act, coupled with a lack of local enforcement, meant that many children continued to work. As late as 1891, over 100,000 girls between the ages of 10 and 14 were still employed as domestic servants in England and Wales. That same year, the British government dragged its feet at raising the minimum age for part-time factory work from 10 to 11, even though they had promised to extend it to 12 at an 1890 European congress on child labor.

Essay on growing up - Do My Research Paper For Me

Education reform also proceeded at a slow pace. In the early 1860s, the Royal Commission on Popular Education declared that compulsory schooling for all children was “neither obtainable nor desirable.” If the child’s wages are crucial to the family economy, they wrote, “it is far better that it should go to work at the earliest age at which it can bear the physical exertion than that it should remain at school” (Horn, Town Child 74). Another powerful impediment to the creation of a public school system was religious; dissent between the Church of England and nonconformists over the content and amount of religious instruction stalled legislative efforts until 1870, when the Elementary Education Act finally created a national network of primary schools. A similarly provision for secondary education was not passed until 1902. Middle- and upper-class families could employ tutors, or send their children to private schools, but these were unregulated and varied widely in quality. Girls were worse off than boys, since many people believed that domestic skills and basic literacy were all they needed to learn.